Sunday, August 10, 2014

God & His Promises



In 2002, while casually reading Isaiah, the Lord clearly spoke to my spirit. "Read that passage again, but every time you see 'Egypt' replace it with your name." 

Consequently, Isaiah 19:19-22 read like this: 

"In that day there will be an altar to the LORD in the heart of Kelly, and a monument to the LORD at its border. It will be a sign and a witness to the LORD Almighty in the land of Kelly. When she cries out to the LORD because of her oppressors, he will send her a savior and defender, and he will rescue her. So the Lord will make himself known to Kelly, and in that day she will acknowledge the LORD...The Lord will strike Kelly with a plague; he will strike her and heal her. She will turn to the LORD, and he will respond to her pleas and heal her."

I had already been sick for a number of years by the time He spoke these words to me, so I rejoiced knowing a day would come when I would be made well. God, after all, had promised. 

I'm better than I was in 2002. Except, I'm not really where I thought I'd be by now, either. And until last year, there were times when the incomplete fulfillment of this word was deeply upsetting. But during prayer, a thought about this issue came to me. Here it is:

I have learned on this journey that many, many Christians receive promises from God concerning their future. Consequently, I've also seen an error that is almost universally made among those of us waiting for fulfillment who have received such promises. The problem is we end up making those promises bigger than God. And the longer we wait for fulfillment, the easier it is to make this mistake.

It's easy to spot people who have done this. Simply, we get angry when events do not come to pass when expected. We get impatient, we complain, and we seek out other people (rather than God) to confirm what the Lord may have initially said. We also get angry with others who suggest that we may simply need to wait even more upon God. 

God knows our inclination to worship anything more than Him, which is why He tested Abraham. Could Abraham sacrifice Isaac, his only son whom He loved? Remember, Isaac was the promise made to Abraham. 

Abraham proved to be faithful and was willing to lay Isaac down upon the altar. Just as he was about to kill his son, God intervened and sent a ram for the sacrifice instead. This passing of this test was credited to Abraham as righteousness.

The Lord does keep His promises and He delights in doing so. But if you are experiencing a delay in the fulfillment of something you expected years ago, perhaps it is time to examine your heart and ask yourself what means more to you: God Himself or the words He spoke over you? 

Just food for thought today.

Kelly

No comments:

Post a Comment